This is a list available to the public on Housing Access and Stabilization Services, created by the Housing Help Network.

Please contact us for broken links or suggested websites to the Manager, Housing Programs and Services 647-258-9976.
(Please copy and paste the web address of the housing related services you are suggesting).


History of the Housing Stabilization Sector

During the 1990's, the ability to find and maintain housing was hindered by rising rents, low vacancy rates, and a decreased supply of rental housing. These issues were exacerbated by labour market conditions, a more restrictive income security program and reduced earnings. Certain legislative, political and policy decisions, such as the advent of the Tenant Protection Act (replaced in 2006 by the Residential Tenancies Act - RTA), further complicated Toronto's housing environment. In response to these challenges, projects were initiated through the City of Toronto to help low-income tenants find and maintain adequate housing.

The Housing Stabilization Sector encompasses services that focus on 3 core components:

  • Housing Access
  • Housing Stabilization
  • Eviction Prevention

Housing Stabilization Services work with those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Housing Stabilization Services are offered within shelters (47 agencies) and outside of shelters (41 agencies), including nine Housing Help Centres that act as service hubs. Funding for this sector is provided by the City of Toronto and the Provincial Homeless Initiatives Fund (PHIF).

While the agencies and centres differ in services in order to best meet their clients' needs, their common focus is to aid those who are homeless or at risk of homelessness find and maintain adequate housing. This sector also plays a role in achieving the broader goals of reducing, and ultimately ending, homelessness. Housing Stability Services further the goals set out in the City of Toronto's Housing Opportunities Toronto (HOT) Plan, the Housing First Model, and the City of Toronto's Shelter, Support and Housing Administration (SSHA) Housing Stability Service Planning Framework.

Hot Plan (click to read more)

In 2009, City Council endorsed the HOT Plan, which outlined 57 actions directed to the City of Toronto and its Federal and Provincial partners. The HOT Plan provides a concrete direction and explicit commitment to addressing housing issues in Toronto. The HOT Plan includes the following goals specific to Housing Help:

  1. Co-ordinate and provide supports and housing to ensure homeless and vulnerable people are able to keep their homes by:

    1. Allocating funding to community programs and services which help people find and keep homes.

    2. Advocating to the Provincial and Federal governments to provide increased funding to enhance housing supports available to vulnerable tenants in private market and social housing communities.

  1. Keep tenants housed through eviction prevention and education by:

    1. Funding Housing Help Centres to provide housing assistance to at-risk households.

    2. Administering the provincially-funded Rent Bank program which helps at risk households avoid eviction through short-term, interest free loans.

For more information on Toronto's HOT Plan, please visit here

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Housing First (click to read more)

Housing First is an approach advocating that accessing permanent, stable housing and accompanying community supports and treatments regardless of a person's situation is the key first step to addressing homelessness long term. Housing First was first implemented in New York by Sam Tsemberis and Pathways to Housing. It has since gained support as an evidence based approach to addressing homelessness and create recovery focused programs. The City of Toronto piloted Housing First in 2007; the successes from the pilot led to the implementation of Housing First into 2009 city-wide housing initiatives. Housing First is a key component of the Housing Opportunities Toronto (HOT) Plan.

There are 5 core principles to Housing First, including:

  1. Immediate access to permanent housing with no housing readiness requirements:

    1. Housing First recognizes it is difficult for people to focus on any other aspects of their life when they are homeless or unstably housed.

    2. Avoiding readiness requirements, such as treatment programs and/or sobriety, means more people are housed and potentially in a safer environment to focus on their goals.

  2. Client choice and self-determination:

    1. Clients are able to choose their housing and location. By having the power to make these decisions, housing is more likely to be stabilized.

    2. Supports implemented for the client are chosen by the client at times when they are ready, hence increasing their effectiveness.

  3. Recovery orientation:

    1. Housing First in practice meets more than the clients' basic needs, offering connections to supports or the ability to maintain social, recreational, educational, occupational and vocational services, as well as harm reduction, if necessary.

  4. Individualized and client driven support:

    1. Emphasizes meeting each client where they are at and as an individual, and ensuring supports are put in place only when, and if a client is interested in them.

  5. Social and community integration:

    1. Connecting clients to resources in the community they have been housed in, including community engagement and socializing opportunities. This recognizes that social isolation is a key factor in compromising housing stability.

This section was informed by the Homeless Hub's Housing First resources, particularly here.

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Housing Stability Service Planning Framework 2014-2019 (click to read more)

The 2014-2019 Housing Service Planning Framework was released following an extensive consultation by the City of Toronto's Shelter, Support and Housing Administration and is the basis for the strategic directions of the city's housing initiatives.

There are 7 Strategic Directions outlined, including:

  1. Preventing homelessness
  2. Supporting the transition to housing
  3. Creating housing opportunities
  4. Fostering system stewardship and innovation
  5. Improving access and equity
  6. Delivering high quality service
  7. Strengthening partnerships and coordination

The Housing Stability Service Planning Framework can be found here and includes an executive summary for quick reference on each of the Strategy Directions.

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Housing Access

General (click to read more)

  • Welcome Home: A Guide to Services for Tenants is designed for anyone to use and lists housing,health, and wellbeing services to support staying housed.

  • City of Toronto's Housing and Homelessness Services is the portal to services offered through the City of Toronto's Shelter, Support and Housing Administration.

  • Wellbeing Toronto Map shows many of the services located around any address in Toronto.

  • The National Map allows you to input your postal code and see what social services for youth are available in that community.

  • 211 both the website and the phone number (211) offer information about social services and community agencies in Toronto. Operators are available in several languages.

  • 311 both the website and the phone number (311) offer information about services provided by the City of Toronto. Operators are available in several languages.

  • City of Toronto Housing Hub: find information about subsidized and affordable housing options and how to access these; what services can help you remain in your home; who to call if you are being evicted; and where to go for emergency accommodation.

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Housing Help centre (click to read more)

There are 10 Housing Help Centres in the City of Toronto.

Click here for more information on Housing Help Services in the City of Toronto. Below is a list of the Housing Help Centres in the City of Toronto:

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Rent Bank (click to read more)

Emergency First and Last Month's Rent Program offers interest free loans to help people pay their last month's rent deposits.

To inquire about Rent Bank, eligibility, or make an appointment to see a worker, there are 7 centres with Rent Bank workers. All the Housing Help Centres, with the exception of West Toronto, Agincourt and WoodGreen have Rent Bank programs.

Housing Help Programs (click to read more)

Many organizations offer housing help as part of their work with clients. For a list of agencies that offer housing help services please see the Community Resources tab. Organizations are listed based on the client group they serve.

Types of Housing (click to read more)

Rent Geared to Income (RGI) Housing:

Rent Geared to Income (RGI) Housing is subsidized housing, usually in City of Toronto buildings managed by Toronto Community Housing. In RGI housing, the rent is based on tenant income, usually 30% of their gross monthly income. There is a long waiting list for RGI housing in Toronto.

Housing Connections manages the waiting list for RGI housing. Applications can be done through Housing Connections in-person, online, by mail, or with a housing worker.

Toronto Community Housing (TCH) manages the RGI social housing in Toronto. They are responsible for the buildings and staff associated with running the buildings.

Co-operative Housing:

Co-operative housing is not-for-profit housing controlled by its members. Members are residents of the building and are responsible for running the co-op, there is no landlord. Rent tends to be lower in co-ops because a profit is not being made; some co-ops have subsidized units.

Market Rent:

Market rent refers to privately owned and rented housing. Market rent housing is covered under the Residential Tenancies Act, and is subject to legal requirements regarding maintenance, rent increases, etc. Rent is variable in market rent housing and not necessarily considered to be affordable housing for many incomes.

Since market rent housing is privately and individually owned, there is no one place to search. However, these websites are frequently used:

  • Craigslist is searchable by location, rent, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, and housing type. Searches are displayed either as a list or on a map.

  • Kijiji is searchable by location, rent, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, furnishing, and who its rented by.

  • Viewit is searchable by area of the city, rent, number of bedrooms and bathrooms, furnishing, and housing type. Searches are displayed either as a list or on a map.

  • Landlord Connect partners with landlords who are interested in providing affordable housing, and requires a log in.

Supportive Housing:

Supportive Housing programs provide a combination of housing and services in support of clients with unique needs. There are a wide variety of support programs in the city, often providing services during typical business hours, or on a weekly, bi-weekly or "on-call" emergency basis. There are also some organizations that provide full-time live-in staff support. Links to some supportive housing providers can be found on Landlord Connect.

Temporary/Transitional Housing:

Transitional housing is provided for shorter periods of time by many organizations as a stepping stone for stabilizing housing, recovery, and getting off the streets. They are generally semi-independent living situations where rent is geared to income. Residents usually have their own living space with some shared spaces. To find a list of transitional housing providers please see the Community Resources tab.

Rooming Houses:

Rooming houses are market rent housing where individuals usually rent a room and share the rest of the living space with at least 3 other people. There are many legal and illegal rooming housing in Toronto.

Rooming houses must have a license obtained from the City of Toronto in order to operate legally, and are only allowed to operate in Toronto, and some areas of Etobicoke and York. Rooming houses are not allowed to operate in North York, East York, and Scarborough.

Long Term Care Homes

Long Term Care Homes provide housing and services for people who require supportive services such as meal preparation, cleaning, laundry services, personal support, medication reminders or dispensing, etc. Links to some Long Term Care providers can be found on Landlord Connect.

Shelters

Shelters in the City of Toronto can be operated by the City or by other agencies and organizations. Shelters are generally open to people seeking emergency shelter, as well as specialized shelters for families, women fleeing violence, single women and single men, and youth under 16.

  • Central Intake at 416-397-5637 or 1-877-338-3398 is a centralized system that supports people in finding available beds in Toronto Shelters. They accept calls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including collect calls.

Streets to Homes (click to read more)

Streets to Homes is a City of Toronto run service for people who are living on the streets. They provide mobile street outreach services, street respite and shelter referrals for adults, youth and couples, and In from the Cold space in winter. Streets to Homes also offers ongoing case management for people transitioning into housing by referral.

  • Streets to Homes Assessment and Referral Centre
    • 416-392-0090
    • 129 Peter St 24/7
    • Shelter referral 8pm-8am


Housing Stabilization & Eviction Prevention

General (click to read more)

  • Welcome Home: A Guide to Services for Tenants is designed for anyone to use and lists housing,health, and wellbeing services to support staying housed.

  • City of Toronto's Housing and Homelessness Services is the portal to services offered through the City of Toronto's Shelter, Support and Housing Administration.

  • Wellbeing Toronto Map shows many of the services located around any address in Toronto.

  • The National Map allows you to input your postal code and see what social services for youth are available in that community.

  • 211 both the website and the phone number (211) offer information about social services and community agencies in Toronto. Operators are available in several languages.

  • 311 both the website and the phone number (311) offer information about services provided by the City of Toronto. Operators are available in several languages.

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Housing Help Centres (click to read more)

There are 10 Housing Help Centres in the City of Toronto.

Click here for more information on Housing Help Services in the City of Toronto. Below is a list of the Housing Help Centres in the City of Toronto:

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Rent Bank: Arrears (click to read more)

Emergency First and Last Month's Rent Program offers interest free loans to help people pay their last month's rent deposits.

To inquire about Rent Bank, eligibility, or make an appointment to see a worker, there are 7 centres with Rent Bank workers. All the Housing Help Centres, with the exception of West Toronto, Agincourt and WoodGreen have Rent Bank programs.

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Low Income Energy Assistance (LEAP) Fund (click to read more)

Low Income Energy Assistance (LEAP) Fund is a grant available to people who are in arrears on their energy payments.

To inquire about LEAP, eligibility, or make an appointment to see a worker, there are 7 centres with LEAP workers. All the Housing Help Centres, with the exception of West Toronto, Agincourt and WoodGreen, have LEAP programs.

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Health and Mental Health (click to read more)

Toronto Public Health

Toronto Public Health offers a large number of programs for clients to access. Toronto public health can direct your client to services in their neighbourhood. Toronto Public Health services include:

  • Breastfeeding
  • Chronic Disease Prevention (e.g., diabetes, cancer, heart disease)
  • Mental Health Promotion
  • Nutrition
  • Parenting
  • Pregnancy
  • Prenatal and Postpartum Depression and Anxiety
  • Senior's concerns
  • Sexual Health Promotion
  • Substance Misuse Prevention (e.g., drugs, tobacco and alcohol)

Website: www.toronto.ca/health

Phone: 416-338-7600


Community Care Access Centre (CCAC)

Community Care Access Centre's provide a centralized service to manage clients' health care at home, in the community, and while they are at school. Clients meet with a Care Coordinator who make a plan for how to support their medical needs.

Program Restrictions: OHIP Card required to access service

Website: http://healthcareathome.ca/


Community Health Centres

Community Health Centres provide resources and services to clients who reside or stay within their designated community and/or meet their target populations. Community Health Centre's may have waiting lists for certain services, and may be able to see patients without an OHIP card if they meet eligibility guidelines.

Program Restrictions: Will see patients without OHIP card if they meet individual location eligibility guidelines.

Website: https://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=aacdd4b4920c0410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Phone: 311 to be directed to closest Community Health Centre


Ontario Drug Benefits Card

The Ontario Drug Benefits are for persons over the age of 65, or adults who are currently receiving Ontario Works (OW), Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), Trillium Drug Benefits, and/or Home Care. As of December 1, 2016 the monthly paper drug benefit card is no longer in use. The Drug Benefit Card is now attached to clients' OHIP Card. If your client is not eligible for an OHIP card their worker will be able to provide the monthly paper drug benefit card.

Website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/get-coverage-prescription-drugs

Phone: 416-326-1234


Trillium Drug Program

The Trillium Drug Program is a program where if a Household spends 3 - 4% of its take home income on prescription medication the Ontario Government will provide assistance for households who do not qualify for the Ontario Drug Benefits Card.

Website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/get-help-high-prescription-drug-costs

Phone: 416-326-1234


Toronto Public Health - Dental Care

Toronto Public Health offers Dental Care for free for children 0 - 17 years old. Adults enrolled in specific programs and seniors 65 years and older. For information different dental programs around the City of Toronto click here.

Dental Programs Include:

  • Examinations
  • X-rays
  • Fillings
  • Cleaning
  • Some root canal treatments
  • Extractions
  • Emergency and urgent dental care to treat issues like dental pain or cavitites
  • Full or partial dentures are also covered but clients are asked to pay the full laboratory cost for dentures or denture repair.

Website: http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=51b74485d1210410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Phone: 311


Concurrent Disorders Support Services

Fred Victor is the lead agency involved with Concurrent Disorders Support Services (CDSS), which provides case management for clients who are experiencing mental illness and substance addiction. To apply for this program clients must fill out an application and a privacy consent form. Clients should be referred to the program by a doctor or agency.

Program Restrictions:

  • Must be 16 years or older;
  • have a co-occurring mental health disorder and be actively using one or more substances;
  • have other challenges affecting social welfare, such as homelessness, disability, cognitive impairment or history of trauma;
  • Fill out an application form for the program;
  • OHIP is not required for entry into program, but some services may require an OHIP card.

Website: http://www.fredvictor.org/cdss

Phone: 416-364-8228 ext. 3311 or 3365


Community Occupational Therapy Associates (COTA)

COTA offers a wide range of services to adults living with serious mental illness, geriatric mental health conditions, acquired brain injuries, developmental disabilities and dual diagnoses

Programs Include:

  • Acquired Brain Injury Services
  • Developmental and Dual Diagnosis Services
  • Geriatric Mental Health Services
  • Homelessness Related Services
  • Mental Health Services
  • Mental Health and Justice Services

Program Instructions: Each program has a different referral process. Please review the program's web page or call the agency for more information.

Website: http://www.cotainspires.ca/

Phone: 416-758-9230


Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) provides a clinical structure guided by the clinical and social needs of each client. CAMH provides Case management services and residential programs.

Programs Include:

  • Addiction Services
  • Child and Youth and emerging Adult programs
  • Complex Mental Illness/Forensic Services
  • Complex Mental Illness
  • Adult Neurodevelopmental Services
  • Emergency Department
  • Geriatric mental Health Services
  • Integrated Care Pathways
  • Mood and Anxiety Services
  • Clinical Outreach Services
  • Specialty Clinics
  • Support for Families and Friends
  • Women's Services

Program Restrictions:

  • Programs may require OHIP card
  • Some programs require a referral form to be filled out

Website: http://www.camh.ca/

Phone: 416-535-8501


Smiles 4 Canada

Smiles 4 Canada is a program run by the Canadian Foundation for the Advancement of Orthodontics (CFAO) in conjunction with the Canadian Association of Orthodontists (CAO). The program facilitates the orthodontic treatment of deserving young Canadians who would otherwise not be able to afford treatment. Applicants to the program must be under 14 years old. Patients who are accepted for treatment through the program will be treated by a local participating orthodontist. Patients' families are only required to pay a small administrative fee, generally less than 10% of a complete course of treatment.

Webstie: http://smiles4canada.yoursmileourspecialty.ca/

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Harm Reduction and Addiction Programs (click to read more)

Toronto Public Health - Harm Reduction Programs

Harm Reduction Programs offer resources and counseling for clients who use substances. Harm Reduction aims to provide people using substances access to safe drug kits, testing for communicable diseases and counseling and support services fo clients. Toronto Harm Reduction services are offered within the community either at clinics or mobile outreach facilities. RENT provides a Best Practice feature for housing professionals who work in a harm reduction framework here.


The Works

The Works is Toronto Public Health's Harm Reduction Hub.

Program Includes:

  • Harm Reduction Supplies and Counselling
  • Methadone Works - Opioid Substitution Clinic
  • Naloxone kits and Overdose Response Training (>POINT program)
  • Testing and Vaccination
  • Mobile Outreach

Program Restrictions:

  • Drop In: 277 Victoria Street and operates from Monday - Friday 10:00am - 5:00pm
  • Outreach Van: Monday - Saturday 6:30 - 11:30pm (Call after 4:30pm to make an appointment)

Website: https://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=3732be9b82e0b410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Phone: 416-392-0520


Metro Area Addiction Referral Service (MAARS)

Metro Area Addiction Referral Service (MAARS) run by CAMH is a referral program for Addiction Services in the City of Toronto. The client or concerned party meets with a therapist to determine which forms of treatment and services are right for the client.

Program Restrictions:

  • Clients should call to self-refer. Third parties cannot refer without consent.
  • Clients must call to schedule an assessment

Website: http://www.camh.ca/en/hospital/care_program_and_services/addiction_programs/Pages/guide_maars_clinic.aspx

Phone: 416-599-1448

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Financial/Saving Programs (click to read more)

RENT Income Support Resource

RENT has an Income Support Resource that provides links and information about Income Supports available to low-income individuals and families. Click here to access this resource.


Voluntary Trusteeship Programs

The City of Toronto funds four community voluntary Trusteeship Programs for low-income clients who require help with financial literacy and payment of rent and bills associated with housing. All four programs are currently operating with a waitlist.

Program Restrictions:

  • Programs where individuals must be a client of Streets to Homes:
    • St. Stephen's Community House
    • Central Neighbourhood House

Website: https://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=19556b76cd483510VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Phone: 311

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Personal Identification (click to read more)

Partners Access and Identification (PAID Clinic)

Partners Access and Identification (PAID Clinic) are drop-in style programs that help street involved clients gain access to their personal identification. Some locations are "closed to clients receiving services at the agency or are from that agency.

Program Includes:

  • Birth Registration
  • Canadian Birth Certificate - wallet size
  • Verification of Status - formerly known as Record of Landing
  • Ontario Health Card, if the person does not have an address and any other ID

Program Restrictions:

  • Program workers cannot assist in replacing the following types of identification:
    • Permanent Resident (PR) Card
    • Canadian Citizenship Card
    • Foreign Birth Certificates
    • Canadian or Foreign Passport
    • Ontario Driver License
    • Ontario Photo ID Card

Website: https://www.neighbourhoodlink.org/partners-for-access-and-identification-paid/

Phone: 416-691-7407


Service Ontario - Identification

Service Ontario has many different outlets for clients to access and/or replace lost or stolen identification. Service Ontario's allows residents to apply for identification needed to access services such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP card) and the Ontario Photo Identification Card. There are various locations located throughout Toronto.

Website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/serviceontario

Phone: 416-326-1234

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Legal (click to read more)

Legal Aid Ontario

Legal Aid Ontario provides legal help for individuals who are in conflict with the Criminal Justice System of Canada. Once you are approved for legal aid you receive a voucher which can be used towards your legal defense.

Program Restrictions: You must meet the income guidelines to access legal aid. Click here to se the income chart for Legal Aid.

Website: http://www.legalaid.on.ca/en/

Phone: 416-979-1446


Victim/Witness Assistance Program

The Victim/Witness Assistance Program is run by the Ministry of Attorney General for the province of Ontario. The program is geared to help with resources and assistance for person(s) who are affected by a criminal act. The program assistance starts once charges are laid and continues until the completion of the trail.

Website: https://www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/english/ovss/programs.php#vwap

Phone: 1-888-579-2888


Family Court Support Workers Program

The Family Court Support Workers Program is run by the Ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario and provides support and resources to individuals who are victims of domestic violence and involved in Family Court. A support worker can provide resources and assistance for the victims during their time in Family Court.

Website: https://www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/english/ovss/programs.php#family

Phone: 1-888-579-2888


Indigenous Court Workers

Indigenous Court Workers is a service provided to individuals who identify as Indigenous and who are in conflict with the Criminal Justice System. An Indigenous court worker can work with a client to provide resources and supports during their conflict with the Criminal Justice System.

Program Includes:

  • Providing Indigenous persons charged with an offence and their family members with accurate information at the earliest possible stage of the criminal justice process;
  • Referring Indigenous persons charged with an offence to appropriate legal resources at key stages of the justice process (e.g., arrest, trial, sentencing), where practical;
  • Referring Indigenous persons charged with an offence to appropriate resources, such as, social and medical services, education, employment and Indigenous community support. These resources will ensure that they have help in addressing the underlying problems which may have contributed to their charges. Where appropriate, Court workers advocate for these services before the courts and ensure, to the extent possible, that they are delivered;
  • Providing assistance, as appropriate, to other Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice process (for example, victims, witnesses and family members);
  • Promoting and facilitating practical, community-based justice initiatives that help communities to identify and address problems that could end up in the courts or community justice system; and
  • Serving as a 'bridge' between criminal justice officials and Indigenous people and communities by advocating for Aboriginal people before the courts, providing liaison, and promoting two-way communication.

Website: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/fund-fina/gov-gouv/acp-apc/index.html

Phone: 1-800-772-9291

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Education (click to read more)

Ontario Works (Ow) Education Opportunities

Ontario Works provides referrals and monetary support for education opportunities for clients. These include:

  • Completing High School
  • Language Skills
  • Upgrades in reading, writing, and math
  • Job Specific Skills
  • Literacy Screening and Training
  • Learning, Earning and Parenting (LEAP)

Website: http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/ow/help/employment_activities.aspx

Phone: Varies depending on case worker


Redirection through Education (George Brown College)

Redirection Through Education (RTE) is supported education program that provides students with a mental health history the opportunity to assess their readiness for full-time school or work.

Website: http://www.georgebrown.ca/rtewe/

Phone: 416-415-5000 ext. 2315


Toronto Employment Centres

The City of Toronto operates 19 employment centers throughout the city. The employment center's goal is to help an individual locate and acquire meaningful employment and education. At an employment centre, individuals have access to the following supports:

  • Coaching and guided job search support, with information on resume writing, interview skills and more;
  • Access to computers, Internet, printers, fax machines and telephones;
  • Career development workshops and job fairs, books and other printed materials; and
  • Information about:
    • Employment and Social Services' benefits and supports
    • Community and government resources
    • career planning
    • the labour market
    • volunteering and work experience
    • upgrading your education, post-secondary options and skill training
    • job incentive program

Website: toronto.ca/employmentandsocialservices

Phone: 311

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Streets to Homes (click to read more)

Streets to Homes is a City of Toronto run service for people who are living on the streets. They provide mobile street outreach services, street respite and shelter referrals for adults, youth and couples, and In from the Cold space in winter. Streets to Homes also offers ongoing case management for people transitioning into housing by referral.

  • Streets to Homes Assessment and Referral Centre
    • 416-392-0090
    • 129 Peter St 24/7
    • Shelter referral 8pm-8am

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Community Resources

There are many community resources in Toronto that provide housing access, stability, and eviction prevention services. If you work at an agency not listed here, please contact the Manager, Housing Programs and Services: 647-258-9976.

For another list of Community Resources, see the Guide to Services for People who are Homeless and the Welcome Home Guide: a Guide to Services for Tenants.

General (click to read more)

Aboriginal People (click to read more)

Financial Trusteeship Programs (click to read more)

Homeless/Street Involved (click to read more)

Immigrants/Newcomers (click to read more)

LGBTTIQQ2SA (click to read more)

People in Conflict with the Law (click to read more)

Seniors (click to read more)

Youth (click to read more)

Women (click to read more)

Developmental & Physical Disabilities (click to read more)

HIV/AIDS (click to read more)

Mental Health/Addictions(click to read more)

Rooming House/Boarding Home Support Services (click to read more)

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Harm Reduction (click to read more)

Transitional Housing (click to read more)

Sector Training (click to read more)


Policy and Law

Residential Tenancy Act (RTA) (click to read more)

The purposes of this Act are to provide protection for residential tenants from unlawful rent increases and unlawful evictions, to establish a framework for the regulation of residential rents, to balance the rights and responsibilities of residential landlords and tenants, to provide for the adjudication of disputes, and for other processes to informally resolve disputes.

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Social Housing Reform Act (SHRA) (click to read more)

SHRA provides the legislative framework for how social housing operates. The City of Toronto as the local service manager may set local rules in a limited number of areas as permitted by the SHRA.

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Ontario Human Rights Commission Housing Issues (click to read more)

As of March 2010, the Ontario Human Rights Commission, the City of Toronto, the Federation of Rental-Housing Providers of Ontario, the Greater Toronto Apartment Association and the Human Rights Legal Support Centre have joined forces to promote housing as a human right.

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Legal Services (click to read more)

Community Legal Clinics regularly support people with housing related legal matters, including eviction support. Some Community Legal Clinics require their clients live in their catchment area, so it's helpful to call first.

Toronto Community Legal Clinics:

All Community Legal Clinics can be found on the Legal Aid Ontario website:

Specialized Legal Centres

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